242.2

SETTING UP

With Professor Jeffrey Basinger

DAY 2 AGENDA

PROJECT MANAGEMENT HOUSEKEEPING

  1. Staying organized (managing your media)

1.1 File formatting … stay consistent.


Use this file naming format when submitting files: 

          YMD_yourname_projectname_location_description

Example Folder:

          20220831_jeffbasinger_PhotoEssay_MaristBaseballField_BaseballWarmup

Example file in folder:

           20220831_jeffbasinger_PhotoEssay_MaristBaseballField_BaseballWarmup_01.jpg

           20220831_jeffbasinger_PhotoEssay_MaristBaseballField_BaseballWarmup_02.jpg

           20220831_jeffbasinger_PhotoEssay_MaristBaseballField_BaseballWarmup_03.jpg

           20220831_jeffbasinger_PhotoEssay_MaristBaseballField_BaseballWarmup_04.mp3

           20220831_jeffbasinger_PhotoEssay_MaristBaseballField_BaseballWarmup_05.mov


Use Adobe Bridge to Batch Name Change and to Update Metadata


Metadata:

           Most important fields to fill in: 

           ~Creator

           ~Description





1.2 Equipment Checkout form submitted?



           


1.3 Can you access our WordPress page?

           What should we name our fake news organization?

           Quick tutorial how to use a WordPress page.

           



2. THE TYPES OF INTERVIEWS

The standard Journalist interview

~The normal interview seeking the who, what, when, where, why of a story. 

~Journalist is looking for powerful quotes.

~This is an interview with a person with intimate knowledge of a story or an expert.

~Varies in length from short form interview to long form deep dive interview

~Often conducted at an office, or in a home.   

Billy Eichner’s “Billy on the Street”. Credit: TruTV

The MOS

~(Vox Populi) or voice of the people…

~Similar to a standard interview, but with unscheduled participants who are not actually part of the story, they represent the general public or participants at an event — literally grabbing them on the street or outside a venue (as opposed to a speaker at an event, or an athlete on a team).

~Example: Catching shoppers outside a mall to ask their reaction to gas prices skyrocketing.

~Usually a short interview, like two questions.  

The Interrogation Interview

~Often against resistance, or cageyness. 

~Journalist is seeking answers for the public’s interest, or in seeking truth…  which the subject may have reasons to withhold.

~Often a public official, someone in a position of power, or someone who’s been accused of a crime.  

The Celebrity Interview

~Sometimes this is more about who the interviewer is, than the interviewee.

~The essence of the standard interview is still there (and can sometimes take on a confrontational, interrogation style… think R Kelley yelling at Gayle King, or think Nixon yelling at Frost.) 

2. INTERVIEW SKILLS – BEFORE, DURING, AFTER

Tip 1. Research who it is you are going to interview

 

Tip 2. Think of location that’s appropriate for the story OR that will give the cleanest audio

Close the door, and it’s not a bad idea to hang a sign or note (please don’t knock)(recording in progress).

 

Tip 2.5 Consider how much time you’ll have …….. is this a longform interview, or a short form interview.

Man on the street interview? Sit down and drink tea interview? Knock on door interview where they may slam the door in your face?

 

Tip 3. Plan your questions! 

 

Tip 4. Record your interview (audio recorder on your cell phone is ESSENTIAL) BUT ASK PERMISSION, DON’T HIDE THE RECORDING UNLESS THERE’S A REAL REASON TO DO SO.

 

Tip 5. Transcribe the interview.

TIPS ON HOW TO BE PRESENT:

 

Introduce / identify yourself (applicable to man on the street, unscheduled interviews).

 

Eye contact. (Watch what their eyes do.)

 

Nodding instead of verbal cues. (Don’t say “yes, I agree, ok, etc, interesting…”)

 

Really listen.

 

Cut them off if they are rambling or changing the topic (depending on situation and time, etc.)

 

Say “Thank you for your time.” 

TIPS FOR FORMING QUESTIONS:

 

Avoid yes/no questions unless seeking specific verification. “Did you cheat on the exam?” Is ok

 

“Do you like football?” Not a good question. The way to tell if a yes/no question is good — if your yes/no question itself would be valuable in the finished report. Think, “When asked if he cheated on the exam, ___ said simply “no””

 

Use neutral questions — Avoid leading questions (learn when to use them) — “Do you think this restaurant is awesome?”

 

Don’t ramble “Planning your Q’s helps with this.”

 

No rhetorical questions “Questions with no possible answers” “If you prick us, do we not bleed?” Also think Chandler from Friends. “Could this question be any more obvious”

 

Use followup questions (or have them ready)

 

Ask for clarification / more detail “Just so I understand clearly, can you clarify what you mean by _______?”

 

Ask for an emotional response “How did that make you feel?” “What did that moment mean to you?”

 

Search for depth. Your goal is to get to the heart, find depth.

 

 

Finally:

Unless a celebrity… Always ask for first and last name spelling. Always. Even if they say their name is John Smith. Jon Smyth. Jonn Smith. 

Ask age, where they are from, title (lower third info).

And ask for contact info for followups. 

IN CLASS:

3.   Making teams of 2 or 3

 

 

Step 1: Meet your teammates (Sit Near Each Other)

 

Step 2: SCENARIOS: 

 

You’re working for Rolling Stone / ESPN, and you’ve been asked to interview famous musician or athlete  ____________. (Choose a celebrity.) 

The celebrity has agreed to a 20 minute interview on the record. Speak with your teammates, and write out all the questions you would ask in those 20 minutes? Craft these questions carefully.

 

 

Step 3: 

 

 

 

SURPRISE SCENARIO CHANGE!!!

 

You’re heading to your interview with _________. On the way there, your editor calls in a panic, and says an anonymous source provided your organization with cell video showing __________ kicking a puppy. 

You have 3 minutes before the interview begins. You realize you have to ask about this in your interview, but as soon as you do, your interview may end abruptly…. What do you do… How do you change your tactics? And what question (and how) do you ask?

 

 

 

Q. Why is it helpful to think about scenarios like this?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOMEWORK:

 

Read the Pages assigned in the syllabus. Next week we’ll start discussing sound.

 

ENJOY THE HOLIDAY WEEKEND!